Gear steering principle


Time:

2023-06-16

Gear steering is equipped with gears that transmit steering input to the linkage and other components that allow the wheels to turn and run properly. It essentially adds steering variation, allowing the front wheels to move faster than the steering wheel. Depending on the type of steering gearbox, this is accomplished by increasing the steering force and transmitting that force to the steering linkage.

Gear steering principle

Gear steering is equipped with gears that transmit steering input to the linkage and other components that allow the wheels to turn and run properly. It essentially adds steering variation, allowing the front wheels to move faster than the steering wheel. Depending on the type of steering gearbox, this is accomplished by increasing the steering force and transmitting that force to the steering linkage.

One of the gears in the gear steering is a worm gear, which has a block of metal with a threaded hole. The threads in this hole have a number of ball bearings that reduce friction while reducing gear play. The block is designed with gear teeth on the outside, which engage a gear that moves the arm of the linkage back and forth. The threaded hole is the location of the threaded rod, which is sequentially connected to and turned by the steering wheel. The threaded rod is designed in such a way (it is fixed) that it rotates when the steering wheel moves. This, in turn, drives the gears that move the wheels.

Gear steering construction: In this type of steering gearbox, the pinion gear is mounted on the end of the steering shaft. The pinion engages the rack, which has ball-and-socket joints at both ends to allow the wheels to rise and fall. The rotational motion of the steering wheel is transmitted to the pinion. The circumferential motion of the pinion is translated into linear rack motion, which is further transmitted to the tie rods and short shafts through the ball joints.